A wicker chair bought at a flea market for £5 turns out to be a 120-year-old creation and sells for £16,250


Throne ! A wicker chair bought at a UK flea market for just £5… turns out to be a 120-year-old creation by a Viennese artist and sells for £16,250 at auction

  • The piece of furniture was designed by the Austrian painter Koloman Moser in 1902
  • A buyer picked up the chair for just £5 at a flea market in Brighton, East Sussex
  • The 120-year-old Viennese chair has been praised for its immaculate condition
  • The chair has since been sold at Essex auction to an Austrian dealer for £16,250










A wooden chair bought at a flea market for just £5 brought in more than £16,000 for his lucky guy.

The unique wicker chair is the product of a renowned Viennese school of art that dates back 120 years.

The eagle-eyed shopper only noticed the unusual design of the wicker chair after bringing it home from the flea market in Brighton, East Sussex.

Pictured: A wooden chair picked up at a flea market for just £5 has won its lucky lucky one thousands of pounds at auction after it was discovered to be a work of art created in Vienna in 1902

Pictured: artist Moser who has designed works of art including books and graphic works from postage stamps, magazine vignettes, fashion, stained glass, porcelain and furniture

Pictured: artist Moser who has designed works of art including books and graphic works from postage stamps, magazine vignettes, fashion, stained glass, porcelain and furniture

Who was the Viennese artist Koloman Moser?

Born in Vienna in 1868, Koloman Moser designed a wide range of works of art, including books and graphic works ranging from postage stamps to magazine vignettes, fashion, stained glass, porcelain and ceramics, blown glass, tableware, silverware, jewelry and furniture.

Along with other Austrian designers such as Otto Wagner and Gustav Klimt, he resigned from the Association of Austrian Artists in protest at his support for more traditional artistic styles in what was called the Viennese Secession.

One of Moser’s most important designs used in a building – the Steinhof Church – was chosen as the main motif for one of the most famous euro collector coins: the Austrian 100 euro commemorative coin of the Steinhof church.

In 1903, Moser and his colleague Josef Hoffman founded Wiener Werkstätte, whose studios and craftsmen produced a number of aesthetic and functional household items, including glassware, cutlery, silverware, rugs and textiles. .

In 1904, he created the apse mosaic and the stained glass windows of the Kirche am Steinhof in Vienna and designed the decoration of the medallion house of the Linke Wienzeile buildings for the architect Otto Wagner.

Moser fell ill with throat cancer in 1916 and died on October 18, 1918.

She contacted an appraiser who was stunned to discover that it dated from an early 20th-century avant-garde art school in Vienna, Austria.

The wanted piece of furniture was designed by the famous Austrian painter Koloman Moser in 1902.

Moser was one of the most prominent artists of the Viennese Secession movement, which rejected traditional artistic styles.

The chair was displayed for sale at Sworders auctioneers in Stansted Mountfitchet, Essex. It was bought by an Austrian dealer over the phone for £16,250.

John Black, a Sworders specialist who first appraised the piece, said: “We are delighted with the sale price and are particularly pleased to know that it will return to Austria.

“The seller was also thrilled and I think he had to sit down to find out how much it sold for.”

Mr Black added: “The seller had done some research but wasn’t sure the attribution was correct so I decided the best thing to do would be to speak to movement specialist Dr Christian Witt-Dörring. of the Viennese Secession.

“He confirmed the attribution and praised this example for the dignity of its home state.

“The chair is an excellent example of the artistic achievements of the Viennese Secession movement.

‘Designed in 1902 by Koloman Moser, a professor at the Vienna School of Applied Arts, it is a modern reinterpretation of a traditional 18th century ladder back chair.

“The only decorative element is the checkerboard pattern of the straps of the seat and back of the chair.

‘The Vienna School of Applied Arts provided modern designs for the Prag-Rudniker basketry factory.

“In 1903 the magazine Das Interieur published a whole series of new designs, including this chair, which was followed in 1904 by an entire article devoted to modern Austrian wicker furniture in the influential British publication The Studio.”

The elm and wicker chair has proven to be a rare artistic artefact, examples of which have already sold for over £16,000

The chair, which was in immaculate condition, dates back to 1902 when it was designed and created by Viennese artist Koloman Moser, known for creating an array of artwork.

Pictured: The elm and wicker chair turned out to be a rare artistic artifact and sold for £16,250

Pictured: The elm and wicker chair turned out to be a rare artistic artifact and sold for £16,250

Born in Vienna in 1868, Moser designed a wide range of artwork including books and graphic works ranging from postage stamps to magazine vignettes, fashion, stained glass, porcelain and ceramics , blown glass, crockery, silver, jewelry and furniture.

One of Moser’s most important designs used in a building – the Steinhof Church – was chosen as the main motif for one of the most famous euro collector coins: the Austrian 100 euro commemorative coin of the Steinhof church.

An armchair designed by Moser and Josef Hoffmann in 1903 is currently on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

In describing the piece, the museum says “the reduction of form to the pure geometries of the cube, the square […] gestures towards the simplification of the production while allowing a visual interest for the work of caning and the structuring between black and white, solid and void.

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