There Were Many Awesome Craft Shows In Canberra In 2021 With More Coming In 2022 | Canberra weather


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It would take a braver person than me to predict with certainty the events on the visual arts calendar for 2022. Certainly 2021 has been a year of lost opportunities and disappointments with many canceled or postponed exhibitions and many struggling artists at the end of the day. both personally and professionally. There have, however, been unexpected gains with galleries putting more effort into their online presence and using the internet to promote the work of artists online. And looking back on the year, I’m surprised to find that despite the lockdowns, there have been some excellent exhibitions. Wendy Teakel and Janet De Boos’ sensitive and heartwarming collaborative exhibition in February at Craft ACT celebrated creative friendship in a time of Covid. It was taken over by another rewarding partnership of Jenni Kemarre Martiniello and Sharon Peoples. Their exhibition of works at Craft ACT from their 2020 artist residency period at Namadgi National Park was held in March. Holly Grace’s studio glass with her beautiful high country imagery at the Beaver Galleries evoked a nostalgic sense of the place when we couldn’t travel freely. And Tom Moore’s much-anticipated exhibition of his imaginative glass creations finally took place (after being postponed) at the Beaver Galleries in November), delighting many. At the ANU Drill Hall gallery in June, Nigel Lendon and Tim Flannery collaborated on a carefully curated exhibition of Afghan war rugs. These woven rugs see their traditional imagery supplanted by patterns inspired by weapons of war. I first saw these rugs in Lendon’s collection many years ago and found them rather creepy, but they are a creative response to a society that has experienced great conflict. At the Potters Gallery, Watson Arts Center, one of the highlights of 2021 was the Vive La Vrai Ceramique exhibition by Jeff Mincham. It featured beautiful ceramic pots with an attitude that reflected this being Mincham’s 90th solo show. In 2022, I will look forward to (crossing my fingers) some great local exhibitions. In February, Jacqueline Bradley, Canberra Critics Circle’s 2020 Artist of the Year, will present an exhibition at the Canberra Glassworks with work from her residency there. At the Potters Gallery, the postponed exhibition of ceramicists Mahala Hill and Anna O’Neale will take place in January. In June, renowned potter Owen Rye will take a break from wood-fired clay to reveal another facet of his creative practice and in November Hiroe Swen will present a very special exhibition giving in-depth insight into his artistic practice and the Canberra ceramic community. . Craft ACT has another solid schedule planned for 2022. In February, I can’t wait to see what Nellie Peoples and Michelle Stemm have created based on the daily designs they encouraged each other to do during the lockdown. Craft ACT’s permanent exhibition on the work of Emerging Contemporaries will be again in March. The exhibition highlights the work of young designers and creators, giving them the opportunity to develop their professional careers. Alongside this exhibition, the colorful teapots by Peter Minson bear witness to his long career in glassmaking. And in March, the Tamworth Textile Triennial will also be coming to Craft ACT. Valerie Kirk and Harriet Schwarzrock were scheduled to have their Craft ACT Artist Residency Show in 2021, but will now be in August 2022. At Beaver Galleries 2022 there will be several ceramic and glass exhibitions. Cathy Franzi, well known for her ceramics celebrating the local flora, will present in February an exhibition of the flora of the high country. Franzi recently collaborated with Alison Jackson and Dan Lorrimer in a series of beautiful porcelain light fixtures (Craft ACT, November 2021). A Brenden Scott French studio glass exhibit will be held at the Beaver Galleries in early March, but we’ll have to wait until October to see some exciting new works by glass artist Ruth Oliphant.

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