This local teen lit up the Do Lab stage on Friday, the night before prom – Press Enterprise


It was a huge weekend for 17-year-old Moore Kismet.

The high school student, who identifies as non-binary and pansexual, had her pink prom dress ready for an unforgettable Saturday night with friends.

But before the prom, Kismet threw an even bigger party on Friday night during the second weekend of the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival.

“I’m really, really grateful that everyone was so receptive to what I played; nothing can compare to this,” Kismet said shortly after leaving the Do Lab stage where they blasted for about an hour of energetic bass-driven dance music while rocking the crowd not only with DJ skills, but also with rap skills.

Moore Kismet performs on the Do Lab Stage during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at Empire Polo Club in Indio on Friday, April 22, 2022. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

Born Omar Davis in Tarzana, Kismet, who sported pink braids that waved wildly through the air as they leaped from behind the turntable, is now a senior at Adelanto High School in San Bernardino County.

And while they are still young, Kismet is already an experienced DJ and producer. Last year they performed at Lollapalooza in Chicago and the Electric Daisy Carnival in Las Vegas.

Kismet was also on Billboard’s list of 21 artists under 21 to watch last year alongside other artists such as Billie Eilish, Willow and Olivia Rodrigo.

Kismet already has about a decade of experience since they started making music at the age of 7 using the family laptop and downloading Fruity Loops software to create beats while using tutorials YouTube to learn the trade.

“I really wanted to try to understand different forms of music better and eventually my mom bought me my own computer and I was just messing around with software and really, that’s ultimately what led to Moore Kismet becoming,” wrote they stated.

Moore Kismet performs on the Do Lab Stage during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at Empire Polo Club in Indio on Friday, April 22, 2022. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

Kismet, whose music is a mix of EDM, pop and R&B, is one of more than a dozen LGBTQ+ artists performing at Coachella this year, including Orville Peck, Princess Nokia and Arlo Parks.

This is also the first year of a new Goldenvoice initiative called Q+, which aims to empower, celebrate and provide a place to come together for Queer+ and Black, Indigenous and Communities of Color (BIPOC) communities.

Coachella was a perfect fit for Kismet, whose identity is intimately tied to their music.

“A lot of the experiences that I face as a queer black person have directly influenced my music,” they said. “A lot of what I write is about my life and I can’t accurately write things about my life without the same feeling and emotion if I don’t include everything,” they said.

And their set at Coachella was filled with emotion as the teenager jumped wildly while spinning dance music, continuously interacting with the audience and pumping up the crowd, even those who had never heard of the entertainer .

“It was an amazing set. It was impossible not to dance,” said Nick Trujillo, who had planned to hear only a few of Kismet’s songs but ended up staying for the entire set, adding that stayed for the whole set because Kismet was “charismatic and pulls you in”.

Kismet’s next album is a debut album called “Universe”, which will be released in June.

They also have big plans for their next performance at Coachella.

“Next year or the year after, I want to be the headliner. Moorechella is something that’s been on my brain,” they said.

But Kismet still has some teenage stuff to do, since it was also prom weekend.

“I received my dress a few weeks ago and I’m really excited because it’s a very beautiful pretty pink butterfly dress. It’s so beautiful and I can’t wait to take pictures and show it to everyone the world,” they said.

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